£120,000 Investment in Kenilworth Vet Practice Refurbishment

A leading Warwickshire vets has invested £120,000 in an extensive refurbishment of one of its surgeries.

Avonvale Veterinary Centres has completed the refit at its Kenilworth branch, which boasts new treatment and X-ray rooms and a total overhaul of its existing theatre facilities.

There is also a new ward specifically for the treatment of cats and new heated kennels to make sure Avonvale’s feline guests are kept warm and cosy during their stay.

These additions for cat patients mean the surgery can apply to the International Society of Feline Medicine (ISFM) to become a registered Cat-Friendly Clinic.

Staff have not been forgotten, as the work also includes improved office and rest facilities, to make sure everything runs smoothly behind the scenes.

Clinical director Kieran O’Halloran said: “This was an extensive refurbishment and we are all immensely proud of the additional support and care we can now give to pets and their owners when they come to us for help.

“We have always offered the very best treatment to animals and we now have even better facilities to help us carry out our work.

“The world of veterinary care and treatment is advancing all the time which is why we are consistently improving the service we offer.

“We hope people will be as impressed with the refurbishment as we all are.”

vets in warwickshire

The new cat ward, consult room, kennels, prep room, reception and X-ray suite at Avonvale’s refurbished Kenilworth practice

 

Posted in General News | Tagged

Keep Things Sweet This Easter.

There once was a dog called Rex,

who scoffed all his owner’s Easter eggs.

The cure made him sick,

 he was connected to a drip,

 and spent Easter weekend at the vets.

Please be careful with your sweet treats this Easter. Chocolate is toxic to dogs (and cats) because it contains a substance called theobromine which animals cannot metabolise safely.

Dark chocolate contains the highest concentration of theobromine so even a small amount can cause symptoms of toxicity. Affected animals begin to show signs of toxicity 6-12 hours after eating the chocolate. Symptoms vary but most dogs become restless and have vomiting with diarrhoea. They may need to drink more water than usual. Some dogs become twitchy and unsteady on their feet. In severe cases theobromine toxicity can cause disturbances in the rhythm of the heart and it can be fatal.

If animals are treated quickly enough they can make a full recovery. Usually dogs receive an injection which causes them to vomit and empty their stomach of the chocolate. Sometimes charcoal is given to prevent chocolate being absorbed into the dog’s intestines.  Often it is advised that animals are hospitalised and put onto a drip to keep them hydrated while their body recovers.

Please contact us if your animal has eaten chocolate. We can work out whether they have eaten the toxic dose for their body weight and advise you what treatment is required.

We wish you all an egg-cellent Easter!

 

Posted in General News |

Pet Anxiety Month.

March is Pet Anxiety Month. This is an initiative that has been launched to raise awareness of anxiety related behavioural issues affecting dogs, cats and rabbits. This nationwide campaign is partly in response to the PDSA Animal Wellbeing (PAW) Report 2018 that revealed half of the veterinary professionals surveyed reported they have seen an increase in dog behaviour related issues over the last two years. Of the pet owners questioned, three quarters of dog owners reported they would like to change at least one anxiety related behaviour displayed by their dog and 90% of cat owners reported their cat was afraid of at least one thing. https://www.pdsa.org.uk/media/4371/paw-2018-full-web-ready.pdf

Many pets display anxiety related behaviour when exposed to common triggers such as loud fireworks, meeting strangers and new animals joining the household. Sometimes, however, their anxiety can be related to not having their basic needs met. The Animal Welfare Act was passed in 2006 and advises that all animals should have five basic welfare needs met including the freedom to display normal behaviour patterns. Sometimes it can be difficult for animals to adjust to modern lifestyles and this can cause them to express a variety of behavioural issues which can consequently affect an animal’s health.

Across the Avonvale Surgeries we have a wide range of expertise in dealing with common anxiety-related issues and we can advise owners how to recognise and tackle these problems. Cats often display stress by inappropriate toileting, over-grooming or becoming withdrawn. Often simple changes can be made to restore happiness to our feline friends. Dogs can show anxiety by increased vocalisation, increased aggression or destructive behaviour. Subtle changes in a dog’s body language can indicate they are suffering from high levels of anxiety. Sometimes small tweeks in their environment and routine can make a huge difference.

Rabbits and ‘small furries’ can also exhibit anxiety if their basic needs aren’t met. Our vets and nurse are happy to offer advice regarding environmental enrichment and best husbandry techniques for providing the happiest possible homes for these pets.

Posted in General News, Pet health care advice |

Parvovirus

You may be aware that there has been a recent increase in the number of parvovirus cases reported locally. Parvovirus is an illness that can cause severe gastroenteritis and can even be fatal in extreme cases.

If your dog has had their annual vaccination they will have been vaccinated against parvovirus and will have protection against the illness under normal circumstances. However, when faced with an increase in the number of cases locally the World Small Animal Veterinary Association (WSAVA) recommend giving an additional dose of parvovirus vaccine to dogs between 4 and 12 months of age. Whilst the vast majority of puppies will have protective immunity following their puppy vaccinations, there will always be a very small minority for whom immunity is reduced. This is because Maternally Derived Antibodies from the puppy’s own mother can prevent a full immune response to a vaccine in a very small number of puppies. The additional parvovirus vaccination from 16 weeks of age will give greater assurance of protection for all dogs.

If you would like your puppy to have this additional vaccine please contact your local Avonvale surgery for details.

Posted in General News |

Dental Promotion

Dental disease among cats, dogs and rabbits is one of the most common problems we deal with at Avonvale and there are some simple steps all pet owners can take to improve their furry friend’s oral health.

To help you get started on the road to better dental care for your pet, we’re offering a scale and polish for £150, from now until 31st March 2019.

Please call your local surgery to find out more, or see our offers page at www.avonvets.co.uk/services/offers/ for more information.

Posted in General News, Pet health care advice |

Act now if taking pets abroad after Brexit

We’re advising pet owners they have until the end of the month to act if they intend to travel to the European Union (EU) with their furry friend from the end of March.

Currently, dogs, cats and ferrets can travel anywhere in the EU as long as they have a pet passport, which sees owners take their animals to an Official Veterinarian (OV) three weeks before a trip to be microchipped and vaccinated against rabies.

However, last month, the Government issued a paper preparing for a possible No Deal Brexit, in which it advised pet owners wanting to go abroad after 29th March 2019 that they have to take their pets to an OV at least four months before travelling – meaning the end of November deadline is fast approaching.

Our advice

The turnaround for organising microchipping, vaccinations and a pet passport has always been relatively short but the Government has now warned that, with no EU deal, pet owners may have to visit their OV as early as the end of next month for an April trip abroad.

The pet could have to have a rabies vaccination, followed by a blood test at least 30 days after the date of vaccination to show the pet has become immune. Once that is completed, the pet would then have to wait at least three months from the date of the blood test before they can travel.

This process takes at least four months in total. Owners would then have to visit a vet to obtain a health certificate, which can’t be done more than 10 days before travel.

It’s certainly worth being organised ahead of any planned trips abroad with your pets early next year and with time ticking until the November deadline, I’d recommend getting your animals booked in to see an OV as soon as possible to avoid any undue or unforeseen delays.

More information

Please call to speak to one of our OV vets if you need any help or advice on pet passports.

Further information on the issue is available via the GOV.UK website.

Posted in General News, Pet health care advice |

Top tips to help protect pets around fireworks season

It may be hard to believe but it’s that time of year again, when we start thinking about how best to care for our pets as fireworks season gets under way.

We know this can be a very tough time of year for pets, who can become stressed and unsettled as fireworks are used ever more frequently – not only for the traditional November 5th bonfire night but also in celebration of Christmas and New Year’s Eve.

With this in mind, we’ve put together a list of top tips to ensure your pet stays safe during fireworks season:

  • Always keep cats and dogs inside when fireworks are let off
  • Some pets like to hide in the bathroom. Make sure toilet lids are down if you have a small dog or cat. Beware if you have the older style of toilet with the exposed U-bend as some dogs can wedge between the pipework and become stuck
  • Close all windows and doors, draw curtains and seal up cat flaps
  • Let your pet pace around, whine, mew and hide if they want to. Don’t try to coax them out – they are trying to find safety and should not be disturbed
  • Hutches and cages should, if possible, be taken into a quiet room indoors or into a garage or shed. If this isn’t possible, turn them around to face a wall, creating a black-out from the flashes of fireworks
  • Give your small pet extra bedding to burrow into so it feels safe
Posted in General News, Pet health care advice | Tagged , , , , ,

Keeping your pet safe in the heat

With temperatures due to rise again, here is some advice about keeping your dog safe in the heat.

The dangers of leaving pets in the car in this heat are well known but we should also beware of the temperatures that can occur in closed caravans and conservatories. Pets shut inside need shade, ventilation and access to plenty of water.

Keeping your pet safe in the heat - Milo is hotActive dogs and those with dark thick coats can also be prone to heat exhaustion if walked in the heat of the day. Although a dog may continue to play and run around they may in fact be experiencing the first signs of heat exhaustion. Signs are excessive panting with chest heaving, restlessness and even vomiting and diarrhoea, leading to collapse. Heat stress and dehydration can be fatal if not treated immediately.

If you suspect your dog to be seriously dehydrated, contact your vet immediately and try to keep your dog cool by showering them with water, covering in wet towels and fanning to aid evaporation.

In this heat avoid excessive exercise in the middle of the day and restrict walks to the cooler early mornings or evenings. Keep water available at all times and encourage your dog to drink.

You may also have read the misleading posts doing the rounds on social media recently about giving ice to dogs. There is no danger in giving your dog ice cubes to crunch on or a cold paddling pool to play in. There are both great and fun ways to help your pet stay cool during the summer.

Posted in General News, Pet health care advice |

Avonvale Gold Club

We are pleased and proud to announce the launch of our new Gold Club. At Avonvale, we understand the special relationship people have with their pets and we aim to provide the best possible health care in a friendly and welcoming environment.

Avonvale Gold Club

The Gold Club is a convenient and affordable way to spread the cost of your pet’s visits to the practice along with covering their vaccinations, flea, worm and parasite treatments. There are also great discounts and savings on many products and services that all help to ensure your pet receives the very best healthcare. It includes all of your pets consultation fees (excluding acupuncture, hydrotherapy and physiotherapy) as well as their annual boosters and flea and worm treatments.

We believe a proactive preventative approach to your pet’s health is far better than waiting until he or she is ill or suffering to put things right. Regular health checks and early diagnosis of potential health issues may help your pet enjoy a long and comfortable life. We have teamed up with Animal Healthcare Company who administer our Pet Club plans and collect your direct debits on our behalf. This leaves us free to concentrate on looking after your pets.

How to Register

Joining one of our Pet Clubs is easy. Call into our surgeries with your bank details and complete a direct debit form. You can also sign up at the time of any appointment or vaccination.

Pay your first month’s fee and complete a simple direct debit application form to authorise a further 11 monthly payments of the same amount each month. Your first direct debit payment will be requested 14 days after joining and monthly thereafter.

If you cancel your policy at any time other than at your plan anniversary you will be required to pay Avonvale the outstanding amount for the products and services you have received. In the unfortunate event that your pet passes away or goes missing please inform us immediately.

Avonvale Gold Club is not a pet insurance policy. It spreads the cost of routine preventive pet care at the recommended annual doses, which is not covered in standard pet insurance policies, although all consultations are included, it does not cover the costs of all veterinary care so we recommend taking out separate pet insurance for this.

Gold club pricing

*Not covered in Pet Club Plus

**Excludes: Medications, Laboratory Tests, Routine and Non-Routine Surgical Procedures, Out-of-hours supplements

***Vaccination includes: Dogs – Distemper, Parvovirus, Hepatitis, Leptospirosis & Parainfluenza (excludes Rabies and Kennel Cough)

Cats – Feline Enteritis, Feline Flu, Leukaemia & Chlamydia (excludes Rabies)

Learn more by visiting our website.

Posted in General News |

Easter opening hours

Easter opening hours

We would like to wish all of our clients and your pets a very happy Easter weekend.

We are open as usual on Saturday as follows-

  • Warwick surgery- 8.30am – 5pm
  • Stratford surgery- 8.30am – 2pm
  • Leamington, Kenilworth, Wellesbourne and Southam surgeries- 8.30am- 12.30pm

Outside of these hours, from 6.30pm tonight and 8.30am on Tuesday morning our Out of Hours Service is  available. This is staffed by Avonvale vets and nurses at our own Small Animal Hospital in Warwick and is available to all of our registered clients.

If your pet does require any emergency care over the bank holiday weekend, please phone 01926 400255 or your usual Avonvale surgery number and we will be happy to help.

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