Popular Subjects: healthy

Free dental checks and 20% off dental treatment

Dental health is really important for our pet as they rely completely on us to make sure that their teeth are in good order. They are not able to brush their teeth twice daily and take themselves off to the dentist every 6 months as we do, so we must take care of their teeth for them.

Poor dental hygiene can be a source of chronic pain and discomfort for many pets. Most owners are unaware of this discomfort because most animals will not cry out in the presence of such pain – they just tolerate it.

If there is an infection in the mouth it can allow bacteria into the body via the blood stream and cause infections elsewhere. Kidney, heart, lung and liver problems can all be caused by poor oral health. Bad teeth can therefore just be the ‘tip of the iceberg’.

Any of the following may indicate that your pet has a dental problem: Free dental checks and 20% off dental treatment

  •   Halitosis (bad breath)
  •   Sensitivity around the mouth / pawing at the mouth
  •   Loss of appetite
  •   Bleeding, inflamed and/or receding gums
  •   Tartar (brownish hard material)
  •   Loose or missing teeth.
  •   Difficulty chewing & eating food or dropping food

The first thing to do is to look in your pet’s mouth. Halitosis (bad breath) is caused by bacteria in the mouth, so this may alert you to the presence of dental disease.

Tartar is the hard brown accumulation which occurs on teeth. It is caused by mineralisation of plaque which in turn is caused by bacterial action against food particles in the mouth. The presence of tartar leads to gingivitis (gum inflammation). The gums become red, sore and prone to bleeding when touched. Tartar and gingivitis will eventually lead to periodontal disease where inflammation and infection cause destruction of the tissue around the tooth. Affected teeth loosen and may eventually fall out.

If the disease is severe, affected animals may eat on one side of their mouth, lose weight or generally fail to thrive. Older cats especially may start to look rather tatty as they may start to groom themselves less enthusiastically.

When dental disease is suspected you should seek veterinary advice.

Free dental checks and 20% off dental treatmentBetween now and the end of March we are offering free dental checks with a vet or veterinary nurse who can check your pets teeth and give you advice on preventative dental care.

For pets requiring further treatment, we are also offering 20% off dental treatment until the end of March.

Please give your usual surgery a call if you would like further information.

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

Posted in General News, Pet health care advice | Tagged , , , , , , ,

Ageing and our pets

This month we will be looking at some of the health problems that can affect our pets as they become older.

Pets over the age of 8 years old are generally considered to be ‘senior’, and require particular care. This may seem quite young, but consider this; our pets’ fast metabolism means that they age approximately 7 years for every calendar year, so an eight year old pet will have the physical condition equivalent to that of a fifty six year old person.old-dog-sitting-1545519-1279x1705

Common problems seen in older pets include-

  • Arthritis
  • Kidney disease
  • Tumours
  • Heart disease
  • Eyesight problems
  • Dental problems
  • Senility
  • Liver disease
  • Overactive thyroid (in cats only)

Of course, this list is not exhaustive, and some of the problems can occur in younger animals too.

Advances in modern veterinary medicine mean that many predominantly age related illnesses can be managed successfully to maintain a good quality of life for your pet when they are diagnosed early and treated effectively.

As changes in condition can happen relatively quickly we recommend that older pets have a physical examination every six months and that some diagnostic screening of urine and/or blood is considered to establish any early signs of deterioration of internal organs, such as the heart and kidneys.

Appropriate medication, regular health monitoring, supportive therapies and understanding care from a vet who sees you and your pet regularly can help to prolong a full and active lifestyle.

 

 

Posted in Pet health care advice | Tagged , , ,

Leptospirosis

We have recently seen and treated two dogs with leptospirosis infections. Both dogs are thankfully doing very well but these cases highlight the importance of awareness of this disease.

Leptospirosis is a bacterial disease with several strains causing severe liver and kidney damage. It can be spread by rats, dogs, horses and pigs in their urine and is common around water courses both in towns and countryside alike. Leptospirosis can be transmitted to people, sometimes with fatal consequences. The signs of leptospirosis in dogs can be very variable, and in some cases dogs don’t show any obvious signs at all. When symptoms do occur they can include fever, muscle pain, vomiting and diarrhoea, loss of appetite, lethargy, and jaundice (yellow tinged gums).

Leptospirosis is treatable, but it is much safer to ensure your dog is vaccinated to give protection. This year we have introduced a new and more advanced dog vaccine. This provides broader protection for Leptospirosis covering four, rather than the usual two, strains of this widespread disease. To upgrade the Leptospirosis protection your pet will need an L4 Upgrade injection 3-4 weeks after the usual booster to establish immunity. After this a single combined booster each year will maintain the complete protection. You will be offered the choice to do this at your booster appointment. If you have any questions about our new vaccination protocol please don’t hesitate to ask a member of staff.

Posted in General News, Pet health care advice | Tagged , , ,